Tag Archives: learning theory

The Future Home of Iditarod Dreams: Gone to the Dogs

This past weekend was all about dogs. Literally and figuratively. I spent hours meeting with new friends and getting advice on every front. I ran dogs with my neighbor and met with the owners of probably the most famous Siberian Husky sled dog kennel in the world. They only live about a mile from me and I am glad to …

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Influential Dog Trainers and Their Contributions-Part 4

Influential Dog Trainers and their Contributions-Part 4 Over the past several weeks I have posted articles on those individuals that contributed to the dog training world in one way or another and shaped this industry into what it is today. While there are many different “styles” of dog training, much of the principles and techniques can be traced back to …

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Influential Dog Trainers and Their Contributions- Part 3

Pfaffenberger, Scott, Fuller, Reynolds Trainers for decades have understood that there is more to training canines than a set of procedures, or simple applications of principles, no matter how sound.  A trainer must be patient, and an astute observer of the canine’s body language.  The best trainers all have one thing in common, they know how to read the dog. …

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Influential Dog Trainers and their Contributions Part 2

Influential Dog Trainers and their Contributions Part 2 This is continuing series on the most influential people in dog training and how they effect how we train dogs today. Most and Koehler Colonel Conrad Most wrote Training Dogs in 1910.  This work is thought by many to be one of, if not the first, dog training “how to” manual.  Colonel …

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Influential Dog Trainers and their Contributions Part 1

By Robert Forto Walker and Saunders Helene Whitehouse Walker was a respected breeder of Standard Poodles.  Poodles were suffering from the stereotype that they were “sissies”, so in 1933 Walker decided to show dog fanciers that poodles were much more than just a pretty face. Walker was by all accounts a persuasive woman.  She began approaching dog clubs and breeders …

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Influential People in the Development of Learning Theory Part 3

By Robert Forto Breland and Bailey In 1938, Marian Kruse, a research assistant, was bitten by one of B. F. Skinner’s lab rats.  On her way to receive medical attention Kruse met Keller Breland, a brilliant and ambitious graduate student in psychology. A professional and personal relationship developed and they were married in 1941; the same year the United States …

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Influential People in the Development of Learning Theory Part 3

Influential People in the Development of Learning Theory Part III By Robert Forto, PhD Skinner, Keller, and Schoenfeld B.F. Skinner (1904-1990) continued the work that Thorndike started.  He was the leading advocate of a more modern version of Thorndike’s Law of Effect, which states, “The frequency of a behavior increases or decreases according to the result it [the behavior] produces.” …

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